Intensions Study in Men's Health

Intensions Study in Men's Health

On April 27, 2018, Men’s Health published an article titled, ‘Millennial Men May Be More Selfless Than Older Generations’. Written by Melissa Matthews, the article was based on the findings from our recent Intensions Consulting and UBC study on The New Values of Millennial Men.

To quote for the article: “When you hear the word "millennial," you might picture a wannabe Instagram influencer who still hasn't moved out of his parents' house five years after graduating college — someone who's fine with being lazy and entitled. But it turns out, today's young men may be anything but. Seeking insights on ways to improve gender-specific healthcare, a recent study asked 630 Canadian men ages 15 to 29 to identify the values they thought all guys should embody. Chief among them were selflessness, social consciousness, and openness - a change from the traditional masculine values of older guys.”

Intensions Study in The Mirror

Intensions Study in The Mirror

On April 26, 2018, The Mirror published an article titled, ‘Male Millennials value EMOTIONS over physical strength, study reveals’. Written by Shivali Best, the article was based on the findings from our recent Intensions Consulting and UBC study on The New Values of Millennial Men.

To quote from the article: "The results revealed that the most strongly endorsed value was selflessness, with 91 per cent of the men agreeing that that a man should help other people. Openness also ranked highly, with 88 per cent saying that a man should be open to new ideas, new experiences, and new people. More traditionally ‘male’ values ranked lower on the scale. While 75 per cent of the men said a man should have physical strength, 83 per cent said they should have emotional strength.”

Intensions Study in The Star

Intensions Study in The Star

On April 25, 2018, The Star published an article titled, 'Nine in 10 young men say ‘selflessness’ is a masculine trait'. Written by Wanyee Li, the article was based on the findings from our recent Intensions Consulting and UBC study on The New Values of Millennial Men.

To quote from the article: "These findings fly in the face of traditional ideas of what being masculine means, said John Oliffe, founder of UBC’s Men’s Health Research Program. “We were very surprised by these young men. They value openness, selflessness and well-being, or health. I think those things help us think about the diversity within the group of men.” He conducted the study in partnership with Nick Black at Intensions Consulting. Oliffe acknowledged it is possible men are still holding on to long-time ideals like chivalry but are simply expressing them in a different way - by calling it selflessness instead, for example.”

Intensions Study on Global News

Intensions Study on Global News

On April 28, 2018, Global News published an article titled, 'What makes a man? Millennials say selflessness, openness, personal health'. Written by Monique Scotti, the article was based on the findings from our recent Intensions Consulting and UBC study on The New Values of Millennial Men.

To quote from the article: "Ninety-one per cent of respondents agreed that a man should help other people, the results showed, and about 80 per cent believed that a man should give back to his community. A full 88 per cent said a man should be open to new ideas, new experiences, and new people. Black said the shift in stated priorities may be part of a broader societal change, and that men are increasingly seeing themselves as caregivers — and they’re not apologetic about it".

Intensions Study on CKNW

Intensions Study on CKNW

On April 30, 2018, CKNW invited us into the studio to discuss our recent Intensions Consulting and UBC study on The New Values of Millennial Men. Hosted by Jon McComb, the interview explored the importance of selflessness, openness, and strength, among young Canadian men.

To quote from the interview: "The stereotype of the hedonistic, hyper-competitive young man who engages in dangerous and risky activities may still remain, but it is no longer a true picture of a masculine man. This has even led to reports that the life expectancy gap between men and women is quickly shrinking".