Health Psychology

Intensions Study in the Daily Mail

Intensions Study in the Daily Mail

On December 3, 2018, the Daily Mail published an article titled, 'Millennial men value good health and altriusm over ‘masculine’ traits’ . Written by Mia De Graaf, the article was based on the findings from our recent Intensions Consulting and UBC study on The New Values of Millennial Men.

To quote from the article: "Basically, 'if you look at all the published literature on this, the answer is: men don't do health,' Nick Black, managing partner at Intensions Consulting, who co-authored the paper with the University of British Columbia, told DailyMail.com. Getting to the heart of what men aspire to be, Black says, could shed light on why men's health is typically so poor, and how to get around it. 'These constructs of gender, and how you perform them, has a lot of influence on behaviors.' If we understand what those constructs look like, he says, 'we can have a big impact on health.' The team recruited more than 600 men, and interviewed them. First asking them 'what does it mean to be a man?', before probing them to explain their answers.”

Intensions Study in Men's Health

Intensions Study in Men's Health

On April 27, 2018, Men’s Health published an article titled, ‘Millennial Men May Be More Selfless Than Older Generations’. Written by Melissa Matthews, the article was based on the findings from our recent Intensions Consulting and UBC study on The New Values of Millennial Men.

To quote for the article: “When you hear the word "millennial," you might picture a wannabe Instagram influencer who still hasn't moved out of his parents' house five years after graduating college — someone who's fine with being lazy and entitled. But it turns out, today's young men may be anything but. Seeking insights on ways to improve gender-specific healthcare, a recent study asked 630 Canadian men ages 15 to 29 to identify the values they thought all guys should embody. Chief among them were selflessness, social consciousness, and openness - a change from the traditional masculine values of older guys.”

Intensions Study in The Star

Intensions Study in The Star

On April 25, 2018, The Star published an article titled, 'Nine in 10 young men say ‘selflessness’ is a masculine trait'. Written by Wanyee Li, the article was based on the findings from our recent Intensions Consulting and UBC study on The New Values of Millennial Men.

To quote from the article: "These findings fly in the face of traditional ideas of what being masculine means, said John Oliffe, founder of UBC’s Men’s Health Research Program. “We were very surprised by these young men. They value openness, selflessness and well-being, or health. I think those things help us think about the diversity within the group of men.” He conducted the study in partnership with Nick Black at Intensions Consulting. Oliffe acknowledged it is possible men are still holding on to long-time ideals like chivalry but are simply expressing them in a different way - by calling it selflessness instead, for example.”

Intensions Study on the CBC

Intensions Study on the CBC

On July 24, 2016, CBC Radio broadcast an interview on The Early Edition that discussed the findings from our recent Men's Sleep study. The interview, conducted by Rick Cluff, was titled, 'Canadian men not getting enough sleep: study.'

The CBC also published two follow-up articles titled, '30% of Canadian men not getting enough sleep' and 'Un tiers des hommes canadiens manquent de sommeil, selon une étude.'

Intensions Study: Mental Health Literacy

Intensions Study: Mental Health Literacy

A new study by Intensions Consulting and the University of British Columbia was recently published in the Journal of Mental Health, under the title, 'Men's depression and suicide literacy: a nationally representative Canadian survey.'

The study, which surveyed 901 English-speaking Canadian adults, confirmed a number of gaps in men's depression literacy, with over a third of Canadian adults (38%) incorrectly believing that having several distinct personalities may be a sign of men’s depression, and almost a quarter of Canadian adults (24%) incorrectly believing that men with depression often speak in a rambling and disjointed way.